Posts Tagged ‘Mental illness’

Mosquitoland

By David Arnold

ISBN 9780451470775

mos

“I am a collection of oddities, a circus of neurons and electrons: my heart is the ringmaster, my soul is the trapeze artist, and the world is my audience. It sounds strange because it is, and it is, because I am strange.”
After the sudden collapse of her family, Mim Malone is dragged from her home in northern Ohio to the “wastelands” of Mississippi, where she lives in a medicated milieu with her dad and new stepmom. Before the dust has a chance to settle, she learns her mother is sick back in Cleveland.
So she ditches her new life and hops aboard a northbound Greyhound bus to her real home and her real mother, meeting a quirky cast of fellow travelers along the way. But when her thousand-mile journey takes a few turns she could never see coming, Mim must confront her own demons, redefining her notions of love, loyalty, and what it means to be sane.”

This debut novel is having rave reviews, such as  heartfelt and hilarious, and sharp, sad, and surreal.

 

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All the bright places
By Jennifer Niven

ISBN 9780141357034

I must say I have not read this novel but have been following its build up and it is high on my list to buy and read. I am in two minds though, as I can’t wait to see how this book about Violet Markey and Theodore Finch plays out but I am almost afraid to read it. In the space of 12 months 4 young men I have known have all tragically taken their lives. However, we can not hide the fact, that teen depression and mental illness exists. We can not ignore the damage and impact these illnesses have. So yes! I want to read this book but no spoilers please. I want to find out for myself how it all ends.
From the publisher’s web site because their blurb says it best.
“Theodore Finch wants to take his own life. I’m broken, and no one can fix it.

Violet Markey us devastated by her sister’s death. In that instant we went plowing through the guardrail, my words died too.

They meet on the ledge of the school bell tower, and so their story begins. It’s only together they can be themselves . . .

I send a message to Violet: ‘You are all the colors in one, at full brightness.’

You’re so weird, Finch. But that’s the nicest thing anyone’s ever said to me.

But, as Violet’s world grows, Finch’s begins to shrink. How far will Violet go to save the boy she has come to love?”

I commend the publishers who have made the following announcement as part of their publication details.

“Please be advised that this novel explores themes and issues that may be disturbing or upsetting to some individuals. These include self-harm, mental illness and grief.”
Please be mindful whom you recommend this book to. It is not for everyone. Those that it is for, will no doubt love it for its honesty and bravery.