Posts Tagged ‘Humorous stories’

Diary of a 6th Grade Ninja

By Marcus Emerson

ISBN 978176029554

Allen & Unwin

It’s my first day at a new school and the only person I know is my cousin, Zoe (but she might be a little too cool for me). I was just another scrawny kid until a group of ninjas recruited me into their clan. It was a world of trouble I wasn’t prepared for. This diary is a warning: the life of a ninja is dangerous, scary…and awesome.

My name is Chase Cooper, and I’m a 6th grade ninja.

This is a quick and funny read for those going beyond their first chapter books. Short, sharp chapters help keep  pace and suspense going. We’ve got a secret society of ninja’s, bullying, a bit of thieving and lots of humour. It doesn’t take long before you find yourself liking Chase and worrying about the trouble that lies ahead for him depending on his choices.  This is a book, which for all it’s fun and games, does beg the question of what we might or might not be prepared to do in order to belong. Loyalty also comes into play here as Chase begins to see the true value of family and friends. Ideal for ages 7 up. A thoroughly enjoyable read set in a school where almost anything can happen.
Heaps more books in this new series.

Brobot

By James Foley

ISBN 9781925163919

Fremantle Press

 

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“Sally is the world’s foremost inventor under the age of twelve, and she just knows she can build a better brother than the messy, smelly version she has. Sally’s invention – Brobot – is fantastic, that is until the remote gets broken and Brobot careens out of control. Sally realises that maybe there’s more to a brother than just his inconveniences”

 

What a brilliant cover. The blue is beautiful and bright and just calls for the book to be picked up. This is a great introduction the the graphic novel format for young readers. The very funny illustrations are broken up with just the right amount of text for newly independent readers. I love the very comical expressive eyes particular when Sally gets mad. They really are a window to the soul and in this case, Sally’s honest big-sister frustrations are quite obvious. This is very funny, especially for those readers with younger siblings. I mean who hasn’t thought of ways to dispense with, or swap a younger brother or sister – momentarily of course! Sally does find that her creation isn’t quite what she hoped for but her little brother seems to be totally oblivious to her plans and sits their looking perfectly cute. I do think this would make an ideal little series so I hope there are more adventures with Sally.

An ideal book to encourage creative  and makerspace thinking.

 

Teaching notes found here.

Barking mad

By Tom E. Moffatt

ISBN 9781775433743

Schloastic NZ

5

 

At first, Fingers refuses to believe that his Granddad has gone BARKING MAD! But what straight-thinking grownup goes around LICKING the postman, growling like a dog and chasing hospital security guards up trees? And when Fingers and his sister Sally discover a BIZARRE machine in Granddads workshop, mix-ups turn into MIND-SWAPPING madness one look at Granddad’s dog DaVinci is proof of that!

Finn and his sister Sally arrive at their grandfather’s home only to find a hospital security guard, two ambulance men and a policeman all trying to get their granddad into an ambulance. Granddad has completely lost the plot and is doing the strangest things. Finn discovers the reason and then gets caught up in a mission to save his granddad.

Barking mad will suit readers from middle primary upwards. Short chapters, funny illustrations and a story that keeps going and going. Every time Fingers gets close to finding a solution he is confronted with a new dilema. Funny, quirky, and a good read aloud.  Lots of laugh out loud moments, especially when Finn ends up his sister’s body.

Barking mad is the winner of the Tom Fitzgibbon Award. I hope to see more from this newly published author Tom E. Moffatt

All the wrong questions : who could that be at this hour
By Lemony Snicket

I am currently reading this book and enjoying the rather dry humour which is so much a signature of Lemony Snicket’s books.
Questions – so many questions but are they the right ones. Love the way the author talks to the reader explaning the meanings of words. The whole interaction between reader and writer is one of the things that make Snicket special.
Lemony Snicket is 13 and begins recounting his early experiences as an apprentice to S. Theodora Markson, a rather unpleasant and pretentious woman who isn’t quite as intelligent as she thinks she is. They are investigating the theft of an heirloom from a house in the town Stain’d-by-the-Sea. It used to be a seaside town but the sea was drained! Will continue reading as am enjoying it and want to see how it ends. It is book one in a series of four.

Noah Barleywater runs away
By John Boyne

I am also reading this book at the moment – well listening to the audio book in the car on the way to work and when I am out and about. (I “read” so many books in the car these days – great way to catch up on books I have missed). Noah Barleywater is a fairytale of sorts with wonderful humourous characters. Noah is running away from all his worries and problems and heads down an untrodden path through the forest. He meets an unusual toymaker with a story to tell. Together life will change forever for Noah.
The good thing about the audio book is the narrators accents. Brilliant!